Blue is the Warmest Color

Blue is the Warmest Color

By Nahid Taheri

Inspired by Julie Maroh’s graphic novel of the same name, Blue Is the Warmest Color is the story of Adele. At first it seems that three hours is too long for watching a movie, however once becoming engaged with Adele’s story, it is not enough. She loves to read, talks about boys with her friends, attends anti-austerity rallies, and has only a very vague sense of what she wants to do with her life. Whilst walking through town one day, she sees Emma, a girl with blue hair, and falls for her, hard. The director draws us in to Adele’s ordinary life in high school, love at first sight, her sexual orientation, immersion into the older, blue-haired Emma’s artistic lifestyle, her own work as a school teacher and a perhaps inevitable break up as two different worlds collide. On the one hand we can say it is a basic French love story, on the other hand we can share real-life emotions with Adele. The director is not in a hurry, so we can see every detail from Adele, her way to school, when she is eating dinner with her family and even when she is sleeping. The director forces us to watch reality. There are no make-up artists, no costume designers, or use of anything fancy. The colour blue has been used rigorously and it seems to pop up everywhere Adele looks, from Emma’s blue hair to the blue water where Adele tries to drown her tears. When we see Emma with her blond hair, it seems this is an end for both of them. There are number of criticisms for the sexual scenes, but still this is movie should be watched. This is not love story, this is about the emptiness you feel when you are all alone, about very simple yet true feelings.